18 Animals You’ll Be Glad Are Extinct.

I don’t care about politics, or about the huge invoice of refugees we’re getting. The only thing i care about is i don’t have to worry about fierce animals shredding or eating me to death. I can safely walk into the woods, or swim in a lake and not get eaten alive by one of these animals down below.

Not included: Humans, though.

Helicoprion

This otherwise normal seeming shark had a row of teeth that grew vertically and in a circular fashion. Thankfully they didn’t rotate like they would in your nightmares, but it still strikes a frightening image.

This otherwise normal seeming shark had a row of teeth that grew vertically and in a circular fashion. Thankfully they didn’t rotate like they would in your nightmares, but it still strikes a frightening image.

Titanoboa

Probably one of the most infamous legendary animals, the titanoboa grew to lengths over 40 feet in length and eating basically anything, including crocodiles.

Probably one of the most infamous legendary animals, the titanoboa grew to lengths over 40 feet in length and eating basically anything, including crocodiles.

Arthropleura

A bug the size of a Nissan Sentra, the Arthropleura was mostly a herbivore but was found to eat meat from time to time.

A bug the size of a Nissan Sentra, the Arthropleura was mostly a herbivore but was found to eat meat from time to time.

Andrewsarchus

Described as the Jurassic Park depiction of Velociraptors in real life, the Andrewsarchus was a furred mammal that hunted in packs and hunted for sport. Strangely their modern descendants are goats and sheep, not wolves.

Described as the Jurassic Park depiction of Velociraptors in real life, the Andrewsarchus was a furred mammal that hunted in packs and hunted for sport. Strangely their modern descendants are goats and sheep, not wolves.

Mogoloarachne

Spinning giant webs, the Mogoloarachne could eat anything that made its way into the Mogoloarachne’s web.

Spinning giant webs, the Mogoloarachne could eat anything that made its way into the Mogoloarachne’s web.

Kaprosuchus

This walking ‘croc’ could sprint after it’s prey. Imagine running into that in the dark one night.

This walking ‘croc’ could sprint after it’s prey. Imagine running into that in the dark one night.

Terror-Bird

The bird so terrifying they just named it the Terror Bird, it was bigger and badder than any modern bird. They ate horses and smaller animals (all the animals smaller than horses) but thankfully these guys died out a little before modern humans made the scene.

The bird so terrifying they just named it the Terror Bird, it was bigger and badder than any modern bird. They ate horses and smaller animals (all the animals smaller than horses) but thankfully these guys died out a little before modern humans made the scene.

Azhdarchid

Like a pelican melted with a giraffe, the Azhdarchid was a relative of the pterodactyl that liked to eat it’s food whole.

Like a pelican melted with a giraffe, the Azhdarchid was a relative of the pterodactyl that liked to eat it’s food whole.

Edestus

Imagine a giant pair of swimming scissors and you have the Edestus. Don’t run with scissors, and now don’t swim with them either.

Imagine a giant pair of swimming scissors and you have the Edestus. Don’t run with scissors, and now don’t swim with them either.

Cameroceras

A giant squid like creature with a massive 40 foot cone shaped shell, the Cameroceras was basically a real life Kraken.

A giant squid like creature with a massive 40 foot cone shaped shell, the Cameroceras was basically a real life Kraken.

Brontoscorpio

One of the earliest creatures to crawl from the ocean to land, the Brontoscorpio had stingers the size of 60-watt light bulbs!

One of the earliest creatures to crawl from the ocean to land, the Brontoscorpio had stingers the size of 60-watt light bulbs!

Jaekelopterus

This towering monstrosity ate everything smaller than itself.

This towering monstrosity ate everything smaller than itself.

Livyatan Melvillei

Unlike modern whales the Livyatan Melvillei had fully functional teeth and one of the biggest bites out there. Said to be the inspiration for Moby Dick, tis monster lived and died more than 12 million years ago so you can sleep safe on your house boat tonight.

Unlike modern whales the Livyatan Melvillei had fully functional teeth and one of the biggest bites out there. Said to be the inspiration for Moby Dick, tis monster lived and died more than 12 million years ago so you can sleep safe on your house boat tonight.

Sarcosuchus

Rivaling the size of a T-rex, this giant lizard could grow past 40 feet.

Rivaling the size of a T-rex, this giant lizard could grow past 40 feet.

Meganeura

Definitely larger than a human toddler, thought to be as large as some eagles, this giant dragonfly could have survived in the upper atmosphere! If these guys were not extinct we suspect bug zappers would be the worlds leading industry.

Definitely larger than a human toddler, thought to be as large as some eagles, this giant dragonfly could have survived in the upper atmosphere! If these guys were not extinct we suspect bug zappers would be the worlds leading industry.

Arthropleura

So many legs, so many nightmares. This lengthy millipede was one of the scariest beasts to roam the earth.

So many legs, so many nightmares. This lengthy millipede was one of the scariest beasts to roam the earth.

Gigantopithecus

What amounts to a real world big foot or Yeti it was super strong and twice the size of the silverback gorilla.

What amounts to a real world big foot or Yeti it was super strong and twice the size of the silverback gorilla.

Carbonemys

Making box turtles seem cute, the Carbonemys was the size of a car and was a total meat eater.

Making box turtles seem cute, the Carbonemys was the size of a car and was a total meat eater.

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close